The Fastest Charging Electric Vehicles in 2022 

The Fastest Charging Electric Vehicles in 2022 

You want to go electric, but dread the thought of waiting around the charging station for 45 minutes to an hour. While most electric vehicle charging is done at home overnight (for pennies on the dollar), the occasional road trip necessitates visits to public fast charging stations. Also known as ‘level 3’ DC fast chargers, the amount of time spent charging here varies widely from one electric vehicle model to another. 

These are the fastest charging electric vehicles on the market today. Plus, we’ll take a sneak peek at a few EVs that are just around the corner. 

See the latest availability and wait times for every EV on the market

*Note: Charge times are reflected as 10% to 80% because in all EVs, charging speeds slow significantly beyond 80% state of charge as the battery management system (the car’s computer) balances out the energy distribution at the ‘top of the pack’. In many cases, it may take the same amount of time to charge from 10% to 80% as it does to charge from 80% to 100%.

Fastest Charging Electric Cars Under $45,000

Kia EV6

Wind Rear-Wheel Drive

2022 Kia EV6

10-80% (217 miles of range gained) in 18 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 235 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 248 miles

Range at 100%: 310 miles

Starting price with destination charges: $49,495

Federal EV tax incentive: Qualifies

Learn more about the 2022 Kia EV6

Hyundai IONIQ 5

Rear-Wheel Drive

The 2022 Hyundai IONIQ 5

10-80% (212 miles of range gained) in 18 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 235 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 242 miles

Range at 100%: 303 miles

Starting price with destination charges: $45,200

Federal EV tax incentive: Qualifies

Learn more about the 2022 Hyundai IONIQ 5

Volkswagen ID.4

Pro Rear-Wheel Drive

2022 Volkswagen ID.4

10-80% (193 miles of range gained) in 29 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 135 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 220 miles

Range at 100%: 275 miles

Starting price with destination charges: $42,430

Federal EV tax incentive: Qualifies

Learn more about the 2022 Volkswagen ID.4

Electric cars cost $11,000 more than ICE competitors on average. Worried about when you’ll break even with an electric vehicle purchase? We did the math for you. See EV break-even times with and without incentives.

Fastest Charging Electric Cars Under $70,000

Tesla Model 3

Long Range Dual Motor

2022 Tesla Model 3

10-80% (251 miles of range gained) in 22 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 235 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 286 miles

Range at 100%: 358 miles

Starting price with destination charges: $59,190

Federal EV tax incentive: No longer qualifies

Learn more about the Tesla Model 3

Genesis GV60

Dual-Motor

2022 Genesis GV60

10-80% (174 miles of range gained) in 18 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 235 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 198 miles

Range at 100%: 248 miles

Starting price with destination charges: $59,980

Federal EV tax incentive: Qualifies

Learn more about the 2022 Tesla Model Y

Tesla Model Y

Long Range Dual-Motor

Tesla Model Y

10-80% (231 miles of range gained) in 22 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 235 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 264 miles

Range at 100%: 330 miles

Starting price with destination charges: $67,190

Federal EV tax incentive: No longer qualifies

Learn more about the 2022 Tesla Model Y

Ford Mustang Mach-E 

Extended Range Rear-Wheel Drive

2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E

10-80% (212 miles of range gained) in 45 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 150 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 242 miles

Range at 100%: 303 miles

Starting price with destination charges: $49,975

Federal EV tax incentive: Qualifies

Learn more about the 2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E

Fastest Charging Electric Trucks

Rivian R1T

Explore

Rivian R1T fast charging

10-80% (220 miles of range gained) in 42 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 220 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 251 miles

Range at 100%: 314 miles

Starting price: $79,500

Federal EV tax incentive: Qualifies

Learn more about the Rivian R1T

Chevrolet Silverado EV

Mid-Trims TBD

Silverado EV

100 miles of range in 10 minutes is all GM has told us so far

Peak charging power accepted: 350 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 320 miles

Range at 100%: up to 400 miles

Starting price: Estimated $50,000

Federal EV tax incentive: No longer qualifies

Learn more about the 2024 Chevrolet Silverado EV

Ford F-150 Lightning

XLT Extended Range

2022 Ford F-150 Lightning charging speed

15% to 80% (208 miles of range gained) in 41 minutes

Peak charging power accepted: 150 kilowatts

Range at 80%: 256 miles

Range at 100%: 320 miles

Starting price: $72,474

Federal EV tax incentive: Qualifies

Learn more about the 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning

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The Best Electric Vehicle Battery Warranties in 2022

The Best Electric Vehicle Battery Warranties in 2022

Outside of warranty, electric car battery replacement costs range from $2,000 – $8,000 in a hybrid or plug-in hybrid all the way to $12,000 – $20,000 in a fully-electric vehicle. It’s true that batteries should be much more affordable a decade from now, but that’s a lot of money on the line. To protect your wallet, EV manufacturer warranties should be a top consideration for drivers looking to go electric. These are the best electric vehicle warranties in 2022. The top of the list was unexpected to say the least!

The Best EV Battery Warranty

Rivian (8 years or 175,000 miles)

Surprise! The best EV warranty is offered by Rivian for the all-new R1T electric truck and R1S electric SUV. Coverage includes all components inside the high-voltage battery and 70% or more of the battery capacity for 8 years or 175,000 miles, whichever comes first.

Drivetrain components are also covered for 8 years or 175,000 miles. It can be unnerving to purchase a vehicle from a startup like Rivian, so at least they’re offering the best battery warranty there is. Learn more about Rivian’s warranty here.

Tesla Battery Warranty

Tesla’s electric powertrain warranty is split into two tiers. 

  • The Tesla Model S (starting at $99,990) and Tesla Model X (starting at $114,990) have 8 year or 150,000 mile electric powertrain warranties. Battery capacity retention is guaranteed to be at least 70% under warranty.
  • The Tesla Model 3 Long Range and Performance and all Tesla Model Y’s get an 8 year or 120,000 mile powertrain warranty. 
  • The most affordable Tesla today is the Model 3 Rear-Wheel Drive, which gets an 8 year or 100,000 mile powertrain warranty. 

Learn more about Tesla’s battery warranty. 

The Best Battery Warranty For Affordable Electric Cars

Hyundai and Kia (10 years or 100,000 miles)

2022 Kia EV6

For electric cars under $65,000, you can’t beat Hyundai and Kia’s 10 year/100,000 mile EV warranty. The Hyundai EV warranty covers batteries, motors and powertrain components. There’s also the guarantee of at least 70% battery capacity retention. “While all electric-car batteries will experience degradation over time, ours will not degrade more than 70 percent of the original capacity during the warranty period.”

Learn more about Hyundai’s electric vehicle battery warranty. You can find Kia’s EV warranty details here

The Rest of the Gang: 8 year/100,000 Mile Battery and Powertrain Warranty

In 2022, it looks like the industry standard for EV manufacturer warranties is 8 years or 100,000 miles, whichever comes first. This manufacturer warranty applies to the following electric vehicles in 2022:

The Worst EV Battery Warranty in 2022

Volvo (55% battery retention warranty) and General Motors (60% battery capacity guarantee)

Unfortunately, this disappointing award goes to both Volvo and General Motors. Volvo makes some nice looking EVs, and Polestar’s much better warranty is essentially for Volvo’s with a different brand name. The battery retention warranty information was difficult to find, even a Volvo customer service representative couldn’t get me the information. I ended up finding one mention of the 55% battery capacity warranty here. Disappointing to say the least.

I’m surprised that GM is continuing to settle for last considering their much-publicized push to electrify their entire lineup quickly. The Chevrolet Bolt and GMC Hummer EV have 8 year/100,000 mile battery warranties with a notable catch. The battery retention portion of the warranty will replace the battery if it falls below 60% of the original capacity under coverage. See the full details here

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Electric Cars, Trucks and SUVs With the Best Range in 2022

Electric Cars, Trucks and SUVs With the Best Range in 2022

You don’t have to spend one hundred grand to purchase an electric vehicle with great range in 2022. EVs aren’t cheap, but with fuel savings taken into account, the electric lifestyle starts to sound a lot more appealing. There’s a saying in electric mobility: range is king. That’s especially true for frequent road-trippers and those who live in one of America’s remaining charging deserts. These are the electric vehicles with the most range in 2022. 

Note: We’ve decided to place an emphasis on affordable electric vehicles with the most range. Affordability is a moving target in 2022’s crazy auto market, but in the realm of EVs, we’ve defined ‘affordable’ as EVs under $65,000. If you’re in the market for luxury, we’ve got those covered too.

Electric Cars With the Best Range

Tesla Model 3 Long Range (Dual Motor)

2022 Tesla Model 3

Range: 358 miles

Price: $57,190 with destination

Max charging speed: 250 kW (20-80% in 20 minutes, adding 214 miles of range)

0-60 mph (fun factor):

Federal EV tax credit qualification: No, credits were exhausted. Learn about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the 2022 Tesla Model 3 Long Range here

Polestar 2 Front-Wheel Drive

Polestar 2 range

Range: 270 miles

Price: $49,800 with destination

Max charging speed: 250 kW (20-80% in 20 minutes, adding 214 miles of range)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 6.8 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: Yes, learn more about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the Polestar 2 here

Tesla Model 3 Rear-Wheel Drive

Range: 272 miles

Price: $48,190 with destination

Max charging speed: 150 kW (20-80% in 20 minutes, adding 163 miles of range)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 5.8 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: No, credits were exhausted. Learn about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the 2022 Tesla Model 3 here

Chevrolet Bolt

2022 Chevrolet Bolt range

Range: 259 miles

Price: $26,595 with destination (most affordable EV available today)

Max charging speed: 55 kW (adding 100 miles of range in 30 minutes, or 200 miles of range in 75 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 6.8 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: No, credits were exhausted. Learn about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the Chevrolet Bolt here

Here’s our list of the cheapest electric cars available today

Electric Crossovers/SUVs With the Best Range

Tesla Model Y Long Range (Dual Motor)

2022 Tesla Model Y range

Range: 330 miles

Price: $64,190 with destination

Max charging speed: 250 kW (adding 100 miles of range in 30 minutes, or 200 miles of range in 75 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 4.8 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: No, credits were exhausted. Learn about EV incentives here

See our full review of the Tesla Model Y here

Kia EV6 Rear-wheel drive

2022 Kia EV6 range

Range: 310 miles

Price: $42,155 with destination

Max charging speed: 235 kW (15-80% in 20 minutes, adding 217 miles of range in 18 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 7.3 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: Yes, learn more about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the Kia EV6 here

Hyundai IONIQ 5 Rear-wheel drive

Hyundai IONIQ 5 range

Range: 303 miles

Price: $45,295 with destination

Max charging speed: 235 kW (15-80% in 20 minutes, adding 197 miles of range in 18 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 7.5 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: Yes, learn more about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the Hyundai IONIQ 5 here.

Ford Mustang Mach-E California Route 1 RWD

mustang mach-e range
Shrimp in an EV? Yes, of course.

Range: 314 miles

Price: $53,550 with destination

Max charging speed: 150 kW (10-80% in 45 minutes, adding 220 miles of range)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 6.1 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: Yes, learn more about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the Ford Mustang Mach-E here.

Cadillac Lyriq Rear-wheel drive

2023 Cadillac Lyriq

Range: 312 miles

Price: $64,185 with destination

Max charging speed: 190 kW (adding 195 miles of range in 30 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 6.4 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: No, credits were exhausted. Learn about EV incentives here

See our full review of the Cadillac Lyriq here.

See the latest EV availability and wait times for EVERY model

Electric Trucks With the Best Range

There are now three electric pickup trucks on American roads, but buying one is easier said than done. Everyone wants one, and wait lists extend months and in some cases, years. We’ve decided to include electric trucks that are not yet available for purchase, so long as specs have been released and reservations or orders can be placed today.

Ford F-150 Lightning XLT Extended Range 

2022 Ford F-150 Lightning Lariat

Range: 320 miles

Price: $72,474

Max charging speed: 130 kW (15-80% in 40 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): estimated 4.5 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: Yes, learn more about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the F-150 Lightning here.

Chevrolet Silverado EV

2024 Silverado EV RST

Range: Estimated 400 miles

Price: $42,000 – $100,000+

Max charging speed: 350 kW (adding 100 miles of range in 10 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): N/A

Federal EV tax credit qualification: No, credits were exhausted. Learn about EV incentives here

See our full review of the Silverado EV here.

Rivian R1T

Rivian R1T electric truck

Range: 314 miles

Price: $80,000 – $100,000+

Max charging speed: 220 kW (10-80% in 40 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 3.0 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: Yes, learn more about EV incentives here.

Learn more about Rivian’s R1T and R1S full-size SUV.

Luxury Electric Vehicles With the Best Range

Lucid Air Grand Touring

Lucid Air

Range: 516 miles

Price: $139,000

Max charging speed: 300 kW (adding 300 miles of range in 20 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 2.6 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: Yes, learn more about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the Lucid Air here.

Tesla Model S Dual Motor All-Wheel Drive

Model S range

Range: 405 miles

Price: $101,990

Max charging speed: 250 kW (adding 200 miles of range in 15 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 3.1 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: No, credits were exhausted. Learn about EV incentives here

Mercedes EQS 450+

Mercedes EQS 450+ range

Range: 350 miles

Price: $139,000

Max charging speed: 200 kW (adding 200 miles of range in 20 minutes)

0-60 mph (fun factor): 5.5 seconds

Federal EV tax credit qualification: Yes, learn more about EV incentives here.

See our full review of the Mercedes EQS here.

What does the future hold? Not necessarily more range, surprisingly. Many auto analysts expect range for relatively affordable EVs to settle in around the 250-350 mile range. Why? Battery shortages loom on the horizon. Raw materials are in high demand, and there are only so many places on Earth to get lithium, cobalt and other materials.

Should you buy an EV now or wait? If you can find what you want for MSRP or very close to it, it just might be the right time to buy or lease. All signs point towards higher EV prices for 2023 and 2024 model years.

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Electric Vehicle Sales and Market Share (US – Updated Monthly)

Electric Vehicle Sales and Market Share (US – Updated Monthly)

As electric cars, trucks and SUVs enter the mainstream, the tug-of-war between EV startups and legacy giants is heating up. Will Tesla hold its lead, or will Ford, General Motors and the rest catch up? And then there’s the intersection of supply constraints and public demand. Bookmark this page for the latest quarterly and monthly sales and market share updates for electric vehicles in the United States.

Also: Check out the latest sales and market share forecasts from experts and analysts across the auto industry.

Q1 2022 Electric Vehicle Market Share and Sales

In the first quarter of 2022, fully-electric vehicles (BEVs) reached a record 5.2% of new sales market share in the United States. When combined with plug-in hybrid (PHEV) and hybrid vehicles, electrified sales topped 12%.

Q1 2021Q2 2021Q3 2021Q4 2021Q1 2022
Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV)2.5%2.8%3.1%4.5%5.2%
Electrified (Hybrid + PHEV + BEV)7.8%8.5%10.4%11.5%12.4%

According to analyses by Kelly Blue Book, Tesla sales accounted for 75% of all EVs sold between January and March 2022.

AutomakerQ1 2021Q2 2021Q3 2021Q4 2021Q1 2022
Tesla*693007623075509115248129743
Ford66146361588082856734
General Motors902511263451526457
Nissan29254804234541654371
Volkswagen Group680511675835790817932
Hyundai-Kia282944015921524615480
Mercedes-Benz0004432091
BMW3405114261991171
Stellantis00000
Volvo/Polestar4352153243029863092
Rivian0009201227
Lucid000125460
TOTAL US EV sales98832118233106562147799173561
* Tesla does not release sales numbers by region. The included numbers are estimates from Cox Automotive based on vehicle registration data.

The impact of the Chevrolet Bolt recall stands out among the data. General Motors lost major market share in 2021. Hyundai and Kia introduced new EVs in 2021 that have catapulted the Korean brands to the top 5 among electric vehicle sales. Ford’s EV sales are entirely dependent on the Mustang Mach-E until the upcoming F-150 Lightning makes it to customer’s hands.

% EV Market Share in US

AutomakerQ1 2021Q2 2021Q3 2021Q4 2021Q1 2022
Tesla*70.964.470.072.074.8
Ford6.85.45.55.64.4
General Motors9.29.54.20.00.3
Nissan3.04.12.22.82.5
Volkswagen Group7.09.98.36.14.6
Hyundai-Kia2.93.85.53.68.9
Mercedes-Benz0.00.00.00.31.2
Mazda0.00.00.00.10.1
BMW0.70.80.90.60.7
Stellantis0.00.00.00.00.0
Jaguar0.30.30.20.10.1
Rivian0.00.00.00.40.7
Lucid0.00.00.00.40.3
Volvo/Polestar0.41.82.32.01.9
* Tesla does not release sales numbers by region. The included numbers are estimates from Cox Automotive based on vehicle registration data.

2021 Electric Vehicle Market Share and Sales

As 2021 came to a close, the worsening chip shortage dominated automotive headlines. Inventory was slim to none, and dealer markups were complicating the market for buyers. By year’s end, plug-in vehicles (fully battery-electric and plug-in hybrids) claimed 4.8% market share in the United States. Battery-electric vehicles were 3.4% of all new car sales in the US in 2021. In Q4 of 2021, that figure reached 4.5%.

Electrified vehicles (EVs, plug-in hybrids, and hybrids) were 10.9% of 2021 new vehicle sales. Notably, this was months prior to the record gas prices of early 2022.

In total, 471,426 fully-electric vehicles were sold to American car buyers in 2021. The total represents a 83% increase in fully-electric vehicle sales since 2020.

2021 electric vehicle sales trends

Electrified powertrains continue to see rapid growth. By the fourth quarter of 2021, electrified vehicles made up 11.5% of new light-duty vehicle sales.

2021 vehicle sales by powertrain

Tesla Continues to Dominate EV Sales

As the chip crisis continues, legacy automakers have been hit the hardest. Tesla’s vertically-integrated manufacturing and supply chain strategy has proven to be a major strength. Despite numerous new entrants into the electric vehicle market, Tesla retains a roughly 70% market share among fully-electric sales in the United States.

Check back for the latest data once Q2 2022 numbers are released. Additional data and insights will be added to this ‘living’ page.

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The Need For (Charging) Speed: Is This the Charging Solution We’ve All Been Waiting For?

The Need For (Charging) Speed: Is This the Charging Solution We’ve All Been Waiting For?

My very own Hyundai IONIQ 5 has a special trick up its sleeve. In fact, even Tesla can’t claim it. In 2022, very few electric cars are engineered with 800-volt architecture. While still an outlier, all signs point towards an auto industry heading in the direction of faster charging, better efficiency, and smaller battery sizes – all of which are unlocked by promising 800-volt electrical systems in EVs. 

800-Volt Electric Powertrains Bring Faster Charging and Engineering Benefits

The mass adoption of electric vehicles largely depends on the ability to find real solutions for a few ownership challenges for today’s EV drivers:

  • Charging is too slow
  • Range is not enough
  • Batteries are too expensive to replace

Most electric vehicles in 2022 are built on 400-volt systems, but these systems have limits. Indeed, some automakers are quite happy with their 400-volt EV platforms. Tesla manages to find other ways of mastering efficiency and power delivery, and has not mentioned plans for a voltage upgrade. One BMW senior engineer called settling with a 400-volt platform the “best compromise”, but not everyone agrees.

800-volt systems can deliver double the power through the same current, or if desired, the same power through half the current. The result is roughly 50% faster charging for the same battery size. As a result, batteries can be made smaller and overall weight is reduced, increasing efficiency and ideally lowering the cost of the vehicle. 

Would a car need a massive battery with a 500-mile range if it can charge a smaller battery that’s good for 250 miles in just 15 minutes? What is that smaller battery was A LOT cheaper?

Which Electric Vehicles Use 800-Volt Architecture?

lucid air fast charging

In 2022, just a few electric vehicles use 800-volt systems for power delivery and charging.

Of particular interest is the different paths taken by Ford and GM for their upcoming electric trucks. The F-150 Lightning is built on 400-volt architecture, while the Chevrolet Silverado EV is jumping to 800-volt architecture, and the result is much faster charging speeds for the Chevy. Will this matter to consumers, or will brand loyalty win out? 

Why doesn’t Tesla use 800-volt charging? We’re not sure, but clearly they’ve found success with their existing 400-volt architecture. 

Solid-State Batteries Approach Production

solid state battery evs

Fortunately, a whole host of solutions are uniting to offer a better way forward for EVs. And it’s not all about charging speeds. Solid-state batteries are finally approaching real-world usability following decades of research and development. For the better part of the last decade, $100 per kilowatt-hour was the affordability target for battery development. That goal was reached, but the latest raw material shortages are sending prices back up, and electric car prices have gone up accordingly. The U.S. Department of Energy thinks that $60 per kilowatt-hour is within reach, however it’s increasingly looking like solid-state batteries may offer the only path to such low-cost batteries.

Toyota says it will be the first to bring a solid-state battery into a production vehicle. In typical Toyota fashion, their solid-state battery will debut in a hybrid powertrain rather than a full battery-electric vehicle. It looks like the world will see what solid-state battery chemistry is capable of in 2025.

Innovation Continues at Lightning Speed

Faster charging, better range, and (hopefully) lower prices are promised time and time again with every new EV model announcement. 800-volt architecture and solid-state batteries are the headlining developments that automakers are working on behind the scenes. We didn’t even touch on new battery chemistries, manufacturing methods, and electric motor breakthroughs in the works. We’ll have to save that for another day, as there’s always something new to talk about in the EV space.

But the promise of faster charging and energy-dense batteries begs the question: would you take faster charging over more range? It’s looking like that will be the EV debate of the decade. What are your thoughts? Let us know in a comment or over at the YAA Community Forum. What matters most when you head out on a journey?

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